Our Work

Reforestation Projects General Planting Sights

Our Work

Nepal Reforestation Project

Nepal is a diverse nation with magnificent snow-capped mountains to the north, hot tropical planes to the south, and an abundance of wildlife. Chitwan National Park alone hosts more than 700 species of wildlife, including leopards and the elusive Bengal tiger. It is also home to an array of cultures united by their close relationship with nature that have remained insulated from much of the socioeconomic development enjoyed in urban regions yet subject to far greater environmental hazards, perpetuating high inequality levels.

Pokhara Planting Site Coordinates 28°10’3.56”N, 84° 0’36.00”E

The project consists of several planting sites within the city limits covering approximately 431 hectares. The project aims to support local communities and bring back the forest in this scenic high-elevation city that is the gateway to the Great Himalaya Range.

Mozambique Reforestation Project

In response to the large-scale loss of mangroves in Mozambique, Our planting partners initiated the Maputo Bay Reforestation Initiative with a vision to bring back the vitality of the forests that fringe the rivers and coastline of Maputo Bay in southern Mozambique. The project provides support to local communities to plant and manage mangrove forests, offers long-term employment and livelihood improvements to local communities, and protects the vital biodiversity that relies on mangrove forests to survive. The program began in October 2018 with two planting sites near Maputo and has now expanded to many planting sites in and around Maputo Bay. The benefits of the work include helping protect coastal communities from environmental disasters, improving fisheries, removing carbon from the atmosphere, and increasing biodiversity while also addressing the urgent need for poverty alleviation and the empowerment of women

Djabissa Planting Site Coordinates 26° 9’30.81”S, 32°24’8.28”E

The Djabissa mangrove reforestation site is located south of Maputo, Mozambique, along a large channel leading to the Maputo Bay. Before the start of the project, the mangrove forests found in this area were severely impacted by deforestation and forest degradation from charcoal production and wood collection for cooking, construction, and other purposes.

Madagascar Reforestation Project

Deforestation has long been an issue for Madagascar. It is one of the world’s top biodiversity conservation priorities because of its high concentration of endemic species and extreme habitat loss. In the coastal zone, mangrove deforestation results in destabilizing the coastline and increasing the vulnerability of coastal communities to storms and other weather events that are becoming more frequent and intense as a result of human-induced climate change. In upland dry deciduous forests, deforestation threatens one of the world’s rarest and diverse forest systems. In response to the large-scale loss of mangroves and upland forests in Madagascar, Our planting partners  initiated the Madagascar Reforestation Project in 2007 and has now successfully planted over 200 million mangrove and dry deciduous trees. Our planting partners Reforestation Projects works collaboratively with many different communities with full support from national, local, and tribal governments to reforest large areas of mangrove and dry deciduous forests along coastal and inland areas.

Antsanitia Mangrove Site Coordinates 15°37’13.22”S, 46°26’11.29”E

The Antsanitia Site is a vital mangrove estuary that needs long-term protection and restoration. The project site is located along the northwest coast of Madagascar, 15 miles north of the regional capital of Mahajanga. The project area has a deep-water mangrove estuary that opens to the sea surrounded by large swaths of mangrove forests. The estuary is a vital fish nursery for the surrounding ocean and barrier reefs and is an important fishing ground for local Malagasy. It is abundant in giant barracuda, mangrove snapper, jacks, trevally, grouper, stingrays, and various other fish. It is also an essential fishery for shrimp, crab, and shellfish and provides habitat to a variety of birdlife.

Charcoal producers and tree poachers have targeted the mangrove channel and forest beyond. Over the last ten years, these threats have had a tremendous impact on the mangrove forest, and it is dwindling quickly. Our planting partners Reforestation Projects Malagasy employees actively plant native mangrove species such as Avicennia marina, Rhizophora mucronata, Ceriops tagal, and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza to restore the estuary. So far, Our plantings partners Projects has planted more than four million trees at this site and continues to expand its work every day.

Akalamboro Mangrove Site Coordinates 16°12’16.94”S, 44°55’4.13”E

The restoration area is located in a lowland mangrove forest along the Akalamboro Estuary surrounding the Akalamboro community in northwest Madagascar. The northern edge of this estuary is part of the Baie de Baly National Park. As is the case with many of our mangrove planting sites, this area was severely degraded and deforested due to charcoal production and illegal tree cutting. The mangrove forest is unique because it is a deep-water canal that meets up with an extensive freshwater river system. It is home to numerous fish species, abundant Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus), and various bird species, including the endangered Madagascar sacred ibis (Threskiornis bernieri). The estuary also provides habitat for the critically endangered giant sawfish (Pristis pristis), once prolific in these estuaries. The mangrove forest runs adjacent to a fragmented dry deciduous forest with many good patches. The grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is commonly seen at night. During the day, Van der Decken’s sifakas (Propithecus deckenii) are regularly seen jumping through the mangrove and dry deciduous forests.

With the help of sponsors and active participation from the Akalomboro Community,  Our planting partners began a mangrove reforestation and forest protection project to bring back the forest’s vitality in this area. The project provides support to local communities to plant and manage mangrove forests on community land surrounding the village, offers long-term employment to local communities and livelihood improvements, while also protecting the critical biodiversity that relies on mangrove forests to survive. Our planting partners Reforestation Projects Malagasy employees actively plant native mangrove species such as Avicennia marina, Rhizophora mucronata, Ceriops tagal, and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza to restore the estuary. So far, Our planting partners Projects has planted more than 8 million trees at this site and continues to expand its work every day.

Vilamatsa Mangrove Site Coordinates 16°16’17.09”S, 44°26’47.66”E

The Vilamatsa restoration area, located on the farthest western point of Madagascar near Cape St. Andre, is a lowland mangrove forest surrounding the Vilamatsa community. Charcoal production and cutting trees for wood contributed to the deforestation of the area. Before the start of the project, the mangrove forests found in this area were severely impacted by deforestation and forest degradation from charcoal production and wood collection for cooking, construction, and other purposes. This community was eager to be a part of our mangrove reforestation initiative in Madagascar for years because of the success of the nearby Mahabana Estuary.

 

With the help of sponsors and the active participation from the Vilamatsa Community, Our planting partners  began a mangrove reforestation and forest protection project to bring back the forest’s vitality in this area. The project provides support to local communities to plant and manage mangrove forests on community land surrounding the village, offers long-term employment to local communities and livelihood improvements, while also protecting the critical biodiversity that relies on mangrove forests to survive. Our planting partners Reforestation Projects Malagasy employees actively plant native mangrove species such as Avicennia marina, Rhizophora mucronata, Ceriops tagal, and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza to restore the estuary. So far, Our planting partners Projects has planted more than 8 million trees at this site and continues to expand its work every day.

Kenya Reforestation Project

In Kenya, Our planting partners Reforestation Projects works in the 5,000-hectare protected Kijabe Forest. The Kijabe Forest sits in a complex, dynamic landscape. About 1.5 hours from Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, the forest grows on the Great Rift Valley’s steep edges. Once home to herds of buffalo, leopard, and elephant, this forest is an essential home and corridor for wildlife. Animals use this area to move between the dry floor of the Rift Valley and the protected, lush forests of the Kenyan highlands. As part of Kenya’s five nationally significant water towers, the forest channels water to surrounding communities and the country as a whole. Over the past 15 years, the forest has been cleared for charcoal and timber, reducing the number of permanent rivers flowing from this forest from eight to one. Additionally, rains have become unreliable, catastrophic landslides have taken lives and damaged vital infrastructure, and peoples’ livelihood options have suffered. Ask anyone around the forest—the impacts of deforestation are clear. Eden partners with the Kijabe Forest Trust, regional and national government institutions, and the surrounding agricultural and pastoral communities to restore this vital forest.

Old Kijabe Town Planting Site Coordinates 0°55’7.88”S, 36°34’31.48”E

The Old Kijabe Town site is situated within the Kijabe Forest, a government forest in Kenya’s highlands. The Old Kijabe Town site is 767 hectares of steep ravines and flat plains. It used to be covered in closed-canopy forest, but the hills and steep slopes are not completely bare. Over the last few years, landslides have become a significant problem, threatening the communities living below the slopes. Planting in this area will focus first on stabilizing the soil on the steep slopes through planting indigenous tree seedlings, and indigenous bamboo. The seedbanks in the ground will be restored through direct seeding using seed balls. Our planting partners Kenya team plants a broad range of Afromontane forest trees species such as Cape chestnut (Calodendrum capense), Croton (Croton megalocarpus) Akasinga (Celtis africana), and African redwood (Hagenia abyssinica).

Our planting partners teams in Old Kijabe Town are from communities living at the base of the mountain’s slopes and are in direct threat from landslides. Our planting partners also plan on building planting teams that live above this area, creating communities that are focused on protecting each other from the degradation and threat created from past deforestation.

Indonesia Reforestation Project​

West Papua, Indonesia, situated in the Coral Triangle, is an area recognized as the global center of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation because of the broad range of species it supports, including at least 500 species of reef-building corals. Biak Island is one of Indonesia’s most impoverished areas where subsistence farmers and fishers make up approximately 75% of the population. Our planting partners Reforestation Projects began its reforestation program in Indonesia in late 2017 to focus on the restoration of mangroves and tropical forests and to promote food security by helping local people plant agroforestry trees. Our planting partners planting efforts have expanded rapidly. The leadership team mobilizes local leaders and engages planters to become part of the program and now operates on several remote islands (Biak, Yapan, and Seram) and mainland West Papua.

Korem Planting Site Coordinates 0°53’47.47”S, 136°2’13.07”E

The restoration area is located in the lowland forest along the northern coastline of Biak Island near the village of Korem in Papua Province, eastern Indonesia. Biak Island is located between the Bird’s Head Peninsula and the mainland of New Guinea. Its culture is predominantly Melanesian and hosts a population of 112,873 people. The Island features a tropical rainforest climate with nearly identical temperatures throughout the year. The average annual temperature is 26 °C (79 °F). The climate is rainy and wet, with an average annual rainfall of 2,816 millimeters (110.9 in). Before the start of the project, the mangrove and tropical forests found in this area were severely impacted by deforestation and forest degradation from overuse and exploitation. Our planting partners began a forest restoration program in 2017 with the help of our sponsors and the active participation from the local community. In addition to mangrove planting efforts, there is a tropical forest nursery that produces native tree seedlings and agroforestry species to expand and diversify food production and improve food security for the local population.

Haiti Reforestation Project

The Haiti Reforestation Project restores tree cover by planting agroforestry systems that protect watersheds and improve food security. The project equips local farmers with the training, tools, and trees needed to design their plots, grow and care for their trees, and increase the food production and biodiversity of their farms. Additionally, in 2020, Our planting partners began a large-scale mangrove restoration initiative.

Belanger Planting Site Coordinates 19°28’44.62”N, 72°37’48.24”W

The reforestation zone is located in the Belanger community in Haiti. With the help of sponsors and the active participation from the local community, Our planting partners began an agroforestry project in Belanger to improve food security and protect the natural environment. Our planting partners Reforestation Projects employees partner with local farmers to plant agroforestry trees such as orange (Citrus sinensis), moringa (Moringa oleifera), mango (Mangifera indica), and cocoa (Theobroma cacao) to expand and diversify food production and improve food security for the local population. So far, Our planting partners Projects has planted more than 200,000 trees at this site and continues to expand its work every day.